Magazine – Manteo Book Sellers http://manteobooksellers.com/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 20:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://manteobooksellers.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-manteo.png Magazine – Manteo Book Sellers http://manteobooksellers.com/ 32 32 How Wizard Magazine Helped Create a Forgotten Thunderbolts Hero https://manteobooksellers.com/how-wizard-magazine-helped-create-a-forgotten-thunderbolts-hero/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://manteobooksellers.com/how-wizard-magazine-helped-create-a-forgotten-thunderbolts-hero/ The Thunderbolts are currently in the headlines when it comes to Marvel Comics, no doubt due to a new book in the works and plans to introduce them into the Marvel Cinematic Universe. In the comics, this team featured several recognizable villains and heroes, some of whom, like Zemo, have already been introduced in the […]]]>

The Thunderbolts are currently in the headlines when it comes to Marvel Comics, no doubt due to a new book in the works and plans to introduce them into the Marvel Cinematic Universe. In the comics, this team featured several recognizable villains and heroes, some of whom, like Zemo, have already been introduced in the MCU. Others, however, are much more obscure, one being actually created by a now defunct magazine.

Once Incredibly Popular Wizard Magazine used to have its pulse on the comics industry, which several publishers took advantage of. Marvel, for example, held a contest to create a new villain, which ended up on the Thunderbolts roster. Unfortunately, legal issues and publisher disinterest prevented this fan-made character from going anywhere. Here’s the story of Marvel’s Charcoal, how it eventually ran out, and how Marvel could potentially bring it back.

RELATED: Marvel Already Has Its Guardians in a Sold Out Superhero Classic

Who is Charcoal from Marvel Comics?

Charcoal was created by Wallace and Kroja Frost, with comic book pros Kurt Busiek, Mark Bagley and Scott Hanna actually bringing it into a comic book. He made his debut in Love at first sight #19, or at least his human form did. Born Charles Burlingame, his real name was an obvious predecessor to his Charcoal superhero title, the Burning Man. Charlie’s father was constantly looking for work, which brought his attention to the Imperial forces of Arnim Zola. Zola noticed Charlie’s genetic potential, later having him experiment to turn him into Charcoal.

As his name suggests, Charcoal has a scorched, rocky exterior to his massive superhuman body. The former Charlie Burlingame was incredibly strong and physically resilient, and able to manipulate his crater frame, as well as heat himself up. Taking advantage of Charcoal’s newfound power, Zola and company take over a small town. Their conquest was short-lived, however, as the Thunderbolts drove them from the city. This caused a change in Charcoal’s blackened heart and he abandoned the Imperial forces to join the anti-hero group.

Charcoal remained a loyal member of the Thunderbolts, earning him and his former Thunderbolt teammate Jolt a spot on the Redeemers team when the Thunderbolts disbanded. Unfortunately, he still harbored immense resentment towards his father, leaving the elder Burlingame to die when given the choice to save him. It came back to bite him, however, as a battle against Graviton also marked the end of Charcoal. He’s been dead ever since, and it’s all down to the exact nature of his real-world origins.

RELATED: Avengers: The Avengers Mansion’s Bizarre Return, Explained

Wizard Magazine Helped Create Marvel’s Charcoal

Although it was “created” by Kurt Busiek and Mark Bagley, Charcoal actually had much more “witchcraft” origins. It was part of a competition organized by Wizard Magazine, which, as mentioned, was basically the social media for comics at the time. The contest involved readers submitting their ideas for a new Marvel Comics villain, with the winner being made part of Team Thunderbolts.

Unfortunately, there weren’t many legal parameters like there might have been under such circumstances, so Marvel’s ownership of Charcoal became somewhat suspect. These problems were only compounded by the failure of Wizard to give the winner the remainder of their prize, leading to them supposedly pursuing legal action to claim the copyright.


What came next was apparently always planned by writer Fabian Nicieza, but it was also pretty legally convenient for Marvel Comics. Nicieza had Charcoal killed in the 56th issue of Love at first sight, although he intends for him to return in some capacity. When he informed his superiors of his plans to restore Charcoal, rumors of legal issues surrounding the character were their reasoning for telling him to do otherwise. Since then, there’s been a pile of broken rubble, which isn’t expected to change any time soon.

Related: Rogue Once Stole The Power Of Thor And Mjolnir – Never Become Worthy


Ironically, the character was still just a young man and specifically a young black man when he was killed. Despite this, there was no real controversy surrounding his death, likely because he had little or no real impact in the world. Love at first sight book. His generic, completely ’90s character design certainly didn’t help him stand out.

It should be noted that the legal issues involved Charcoal, but not his Charlie Burlingame alter ego. This was due to his human identity being purely the creation of Busiek and Bagley, with the Wizard submission involving only his supervillain persona. This lack of communication and concrete plans is part of why, despite the contest being for a new villain, Charcoal turned into a good guy pretty quickly. So Nicieza’s plan could possibly be used to some extent to bring the character back, but only in his civilian form.

Given the news to come Love at first sight Marvel Cinematic Universe book and movie, now would be the best time to bolster the property with characters unrelated to the wider Avengers pantheon. After all, the current roster looks more like a West Coast Avengers team than the supervillain rehab Thunderbolts are supposed to be. Charlie Burlingame could be one of them, but Charcoal will likely remain burned to ashes.

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Square’s Head of Payments Partnerships on Transaction Trends https://manteobooksellers.com/squares-head-of-payments-partnerships-on-transaction-trends/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 10:18:08 +0000 https://manteobooksellers.com/squares-head-of-payments-partnerships-on-transaction-trends/ Kaushalya Somasundaram is Executive Director and UK Head of Payments Partnerships and Industry Relations at Square. Tell us about your role at Square and your journey into the digital payments space. I’ve been with Square for over two years and have always enjoyed both the challenge and the opportunities presented to me in my role […]]]>

Kaushalya Somasundaram is Executive Director and UK Head of Payments Partnerships and Industry Relations at Square.

Tell us about your role at Square and your journey into the digital payments space.

I’ve been with Square for over two years and have always enjoyed both the challenge and the opportunities presented to me in my role as Head of Payments, Partnerships & Industry Relations, UK . I have worked in the wider financial industry for over ten years and have always been enthusiastic about the power it has to positively shape the lives of consumers and businesses. There are also huge opportunities for innovation in the industry, which I continue to witness firsthand at Square, where we seek to combine creativity and technology to create tools that can help businesses of all sizes to succeed.

There are so many changes happening in the digital payments space right now. How do these innovations boost/help business and trade?

It’s an exciting time for payments, and fintech in general! At Square, we’re always looking for ways to make life easier for business owners. It really means getting into the shoes of those who use our products and discovering what motivates them, as well as their daily challenges. We are constantly on the lookout for innovation and recently announced a new partnership with Codebase; a partnership that will allow aspiring UK entrepreneurs to make full use of Square’s ecosystem of hardware and software tools, enabling them to start their business with products that anticipate their needs and help them streamline their business processes. Likewise, our latest hardware launch, the reimagined square bracket will help business owners reduce their reliance on too many tools by combining several key pieces of technology in one place.

What is the impact of the current situation and the past two years on the digital payment space, and how is Square responding to it?

The the needs of British consumers have changed considerably over the past two years; therefore, the needs of business owners have also evolved as they need to keep up with consumer trends and protect themselves in an unpredictable economic climate, which have undoubtedly been very challenging.

Our research on the future of retail shows that online shopping has become popular over time for consumers, with 97% saying they make an online purchase every month. This is something that retailers have noticed and are responding to ensure consumers have a decent e-commerce offering when they want to interact with their business. Our data reflects this, showing that 87% of retail managers and owners have started offering online in response to the challenges posed by the pandemic. Tools like our free website builder, square online have been incredibly helpful in helping businesses establish an official online presence that makes it easy for people to find them and buy their products. Many small businesses we work with, such as household goods company Moussem, take this step after initially being engaged primarily through social media channels, i.e. Instagram.

We’ve also seen that businesses continue to struggle with reducing noise to attract new customers and retain existing ones, so we’ve launched new products in the market like Square Loyalty and Square marketing to help them do it, but in one click. Not only do products like these make marketing content easier for businesses of all sizes to understand, they also make it easier to execute marketing campaigns, no matter how complex.

Please describe a major trend that is having a significant impact on the digital payments space – and will continue to do so over the coming months.

This is not a new trend, but rather an ongoing trend that has been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Half of all payments made in the UK in 2020 were made by card, according to UK Finance. This suggests that people are actively adopting contactless payments as a way to pay for their purchases – behavior made possible by the government’s decision to raise the contactless payment limit to £100.00 at the end of 2021. ‘Before, this means being able to accept such payments is increasingly becoming a necessity, even for venues traditionally known to be cash-only, such as Marketplace stores. Not only does this benefit consumers by providing more choice, but it also helps businesses in their operations since, compared to cash, contactless payments provide more cash flow visibility.

What are some of the common issues that affect users of your products, i.e. business owners?

One of the most pressing issues affecting business owners today is the rising costs of running a business. Our recent research shows that those in the hospitality industry, in particular, are feeling the pressure with many UK restaurants experiencing ‘lunch flatation’ where popular lunch items have increased dramatically; for example, soups on average increased by 36%, from £3.38 to £4.61. Burgers and salads have also seen rising costs as business owners are forced to raise prices for their products/services to meet operating costs.

Fintech tools can be one of a number of steps business owners can take to protect themselves from economic hardship. Having tools that automate processes, for example, our invoice management software, can help streamline processes in a business and thus increase operational efficiency. Likewise, our Square Appointments software allows customers to schedule appointments for a company’s services, taking care of simple administrative tasks so staff can focus on more important tasks and interacting with customers. .

QR codes have had something of a mini resurgence during the last pandemic – how exactly have they changed the way businesses operate?

QR codes during the height of the pandemic proved to be a vital lifeline for many businesses that needed to find a way to ensure a high quality customer experience while respecting

Government restrictions and guidelines related to COVID. With the codes in place, consumers were able to order food on their phones with minimal contact with company staff and surfaces (i.e. menus, banknotes, etc. ), this helped provide business flow to many stores, but also helped alleviate health-related concerns for consumers, many of whom were hesitant to shop or visit in person. It’s no surprise then that 39% of consumers want to see QR codes used more widely by businesses in the futuresuggesting that they are well received by buyers.

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Budgeting and budget control – CEOWORLD magazine https://manteobooksellers.com/budgeting-and-budget-control-ceoworld-magazine/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 06:13:03 +0000 https://manteobooksellers.com/budgeting-and-budget-control-ceoworld-magazine/ Operational management must know the causes of out-of-standard performance in order to improve operations. Knowledge of the variances (actual result versus budget) will facilitate control, at least if and when these variances are sufficiently well understood. The only criterion for calculating a variance is its usefulness. Of course, the deviations should be calculated immediately after […]]]>

Operational management must know the causes of out-of-standard performance in order to improve operations. Knowledge of the variances (actual result versus budget) will facilitate control, at least if and when these variances are sufficiently well understood. The only criterion for calculating a variance is its usefulness. Of course, the deviations should be calculated immediately after the event and should be acted upon appropriately.

In many cases, budget processes actually illustrate what is hurting businesses rather than helping them. Jensen, 2001 describes what happens in practice (re SSRN_ID267651). Measuring performance, based on whether or not the objectives set for the period have been achieved or not met, is ridiculous. Budgets and targets mean nothing without careful and detailed budgetary control; how should it be conducted?

The analysis of variance, the way it is taught in many schools and universities, according to a wide variety of textbooks, is put to the test. This article refers to a free downloadable article and two books, showing examples, with citations from various textbooks and exams. Problem definitions are quoted literally. Elaborations as explained by famous writers/lecturers/consultants are given if needed and otherwise are available at places cited in the literature. My opinion is that these workouts cannot stand the test. Anyway my opinion is not important, it is the reader who decides. I give my elaboration in detail, in reaction to the corresponding elaboration published in well-known textbooks / examination papers, and may the best prevail. Of course, the elaborations of others and I have much in common, but the differences are at stake. Wrong, incomplete and unclear analyzes will lead to mismanagement. Only the best integral elaboration is the essential basis for better (operational) management.

Of course, the analysis of variance is only a means to an end. A deeper understanding of the state of the business is the ultimate goal of all representations when it comes to budgeting and budget control. The task of management is to find the reasons for the variances and take the appropriate measures to bring operations into line with the budget. Perhaps the discrepancies and trends indicate that the standards need to be changed.

A strategic investment proposal is also a budget. The results realized ex post (not just the future cash flows resulting from an investment today) must be analyzed in detail; monitoring and evaluation is actually learning. Monitoring/evaluation must become second nature for any operational manager. Actual results need to be accurately measured. Compare these measures to the standard and/or actual budget(s). Locate the discrepancies and study all the differences carefully. Last but not least, implement and monitor the necessary actions. The results obtained ex post must be compared with the (required) ex ante estimates. The definition of the problem is very simple. Likewise, in theory, the path to the solution is also simple. However, in practice the workouts are often not incontrovertible as they should be. Discrepancies should be reported fairly quickly to the right people. Clear and complete. Unfavorable and favorable deviations, each down to the smallest detail, together the whole story, including cause and effect. Proven data. Don’t believe anything. Demand to see everything. Don’t jump to conclusions. Be aware of possible relationships between gaps. A favorable variation in material price may be more than offset by unfavorable material utilization and labor variances caused by poor quality materials, which may simultaneously be the very reason why material price is a pleasant surprise. What has not (yet) been analyzed in detail is the “terra incognita”. If more unsuitable products than the norm are allowed, to give an example, this often does not only correspond to wasted production costs; the revenue lost in the reporting period indicates what the unfavorable unsuitable product variance or process loss variance really is in many cases. Or, conversely, what is the total, after selling all fit-for-use products, of the favorable process loss variance, if the number of unfit products is indeed below the allowed standard? In particular, process loss deviations are often handled too piecemeal. Yet the analysis of variance is recognized as an important topic to which entire chapters are devoted in many management accounting textbooks. Matching totals – only these total amounts – do not provide any guarantees. The analysis must be correct in all respects, not only as a whole, but also in every detail. Perhaps you can claim certain losses from third parties, provided you can prove it.

No formula was used explicitly in my workouts. Regarding my free downloadable article “Budget and budget control” http://ssrn.com/abstract=400120 to see various elaborations for which it only takes common sense to read and understand the reconciliation between Standard Budget-profit and Realized Result-profit. Necessary for all operational managers is this book: ‘Budget control: Scientific development Business economicshttps://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08WJY51SY/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tpbk_p1_i7

My book Business Economics VI Groundbreaking, Learning Content Chapter 9, Budgeting and Budget Control; After Chapter 9, you are familiar with various cost and revenue concepts, for example: sales result, capacity utilization result, contribution margin in addition to efficiency losses, price advantages, unsuitable product deviations , assortment gaps, etc. You are then able to give an in-depth assessment of where the benefits are being realized in your organization and where and by whom exactly the money is being lost. It is a question of finding the causes of the discrepancies between the budget (a budget is a plan translated into money) and the result achieved. No Greek word has been used in my elaborations, and although factual formulas have been used, everything is automatically written in the sense of logic so that everyone can also understand the analysis made. There is no need for analysis of the differences, but rather common sense. Remember that each analysis must be clear and transparent.

Budgeting and budget control is just one of the 8 scientific perfections in my book, not to be overlooked, suitable for self-study, hardly needing a teacher.

https://ceoworld.biz/2020/07/06/basis-for-better-business-administration-and-management/

My book THEORY, n° 1 of a triptych, is indeed revolutionary with even more than these 8 Scientific Perfections, available on Amazon ISBN sites 9781086355635

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdtCIFKwpNI

I am an independent researcher in business economics and inventor of The profit formula® The path to easy profit measurement. I have over 20 years of experience as a lecturer in business economics and have always been critical of what was in many textbooks. My book breaks the boundaries of set science and rewrites/improves large areas of business economics as it is currently poorly taught around the world.

Business Economics is a sum-making education.

Number 2 of the Exercises, Problems, Questions triptych is the ultimate test for everyone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bcy-C6Mp1yE&t=4s

Number 3 of the Elaborations, Answers triptych gives everyone the ultimate solution:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_lXxRy__wQ&t=6s


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Follow the latest news live on CEOWORLD magazine and get news updates from the United States and around the world. The opinions expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of CEOWORLD magazine.


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Jay Gulick – Louisville Magazine https://manteobooksellers.com/jay-gulick-louisville-magazine/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 02:42:18 +0000 https://manteobooksellers.com/jay-gulick-louisville-magazine/ Since March 2020, what have you lost? “The illusion that many people have any idea what ‘the greater good’ means.” What should people visit in your neighborhood? “The Crescent Hill Reservoir. I go there three or four times a week. The Gatehouse is a spectacular building that always reminds me of a walk somewhere in […]]]>

Since March 2020, what have you lost?

“The illusion that many people have any idea what ‘the greater good’ means.”

What should people visit in your neighborhood?

“The Crescent Hill Reservoir. I go there three or four times a week. The Gatehouse is a spectacular building that always reminds me of a walk somewhere in Europe.

Which Louisvillian died that you really miss, and why?

“David Hawpe, the former Mail-Journal editor died in 2021.

Where are you a regular?

“Blue Dog Bakery and Cafe. Egg in a basket with bacon or a loaf of pugliese.

“And I would love to hook up with Happy Belly Bistro, owned by Ashlee Northington, a former Mayan Cafe sous chef. Features some of the best food in town during rotating concerts at Gravely and TEN20 breweries.

Which Louisville closed business do you miss the most?

“The Sugar Doe Cafe in Butchertown was the best breakfast in town in the late 1990s and a great indie music venue.”

What should Louisville’s theme song be?

“’Ohio River Boat Song’, by Will Oldham, because it’s charming and evocative of this place.”

Favorite building in Louisville?

“Too many to name but I really love the Hilltop Theater building in Clifton which I get to work in every day.”

Your favorite street in Louisville?

“Love the winding Southern Parkway that ends at Iroquois Park.”

What was the most memorable show/concert you attended in Louisville?

“TIE: Beastie Boys at Louisville Gardens. It was right after Licensed at Ill came out in 1986. As a freshman at Atherton High School, this record blew my mind.

“Soul Asylum/Matthew Sweet/the Jayhawks/Victoria Williams at Louisville Gardens in 1995. Amazing show and my friend Mike Mays (of Heine Bros.’ Coffee) introduced me to the woman who would become my wife, Mary Oliver, who was passing condoms in the hallway as part of her work with Planned Parenthood.

One thing that Louisville lacks?

“Well-designed and built affordable housing.

What does Louisville have that it should be known for, but isn’t?

“A fully developed Olmsted park system consisting of 17 parks and six parkways – only Boston and Buffalo have comparable systems designed by the father of American landscape architecture, Frederick Law Olmsted, who designed New York’s Central Park and the Capitol Grounds in Washington, DC”

What is it about Louisville’s past that you wish people today could discover?

“The Freedom Hall of the 1980s, when the Louisville Cardinals of my youth were the most important college basketball program in the country. Nothing will ever compare to the smell of caramel corn, stale cigarette smoke, Bud Light and Memphis State hatred that wafted through the halls hugging the outer edge of the arena.

Fill in the blank: “_______’s Louisville” should be the next banner on the side of a building.

“At Sadiqa. For many reasons, but I witnessed firsthand how Sadiqa Reynolds, President and CEO of the Louisville Urban League, spearheaded the construction of the $53 million Norton Healthcare Sports & Learning Center in West Louisville, of which $43 million was privately raised. I can’t tell you how many people expressed skepticism that it could be done.

In a nutshell, what is your greatest hope for Louisville?

“That it will be a more just, diverse, creative, inclusive, safe and vibrant community that my children will want to live in when they grow up.”

In a nutshell, what is your biggest fear for Louisville?

“That our leaders lack the will and courage to make this a more just, diverse, creative, inclusive, safe and vibrant community.”

In one sentence, how do you spend the majority of your weekdays?

“Advising real estate clients and the team of 85 real estate agents I work with as a management broker at Kentucky Select Properties.”

In addition to what you are currently doing: what is the best job you have ever had? Why?

“When I was a senior at the University of Arizona, I taught a freshman class on creativity.”

What’s your favorite karaoke song?

“It’s not a date anymore, but I cleared the room at Akiko’s at my wife’s 40th birthday party when I tweeted the nine-minute ‘Bat Out of Hell’ by Meat Loaf.”

What would you name a Derby horse?

“Wonderful, duh.”

Who would you shade for a day?

“Conor O’Driscoll, master distiller at Heaven Hill. He’s funny, makes great yarn, and makes great whiskey.

Your favorite object hanging on the walls at home?

“Tour posters for the band Calexico, a large pastel of Gaela Erwin and black and white photos of my boys when they were little.”

Which book have you given away the most?

A soldier of the Great War, by Mark Helprin. It’s a beautiful fictional reflection on the triumphs and tragedies of a life well lived seen through the eyes of an old Italian man who served in World War I.

What is your secret talent?

“I make a mean margarita with Cointreau and fresh lime.”

Which three people (living or dead) would be on your ideal dinner guest list?

“Townes Van Zandt, Lucinda Williams and Kris Kristofferson.”

If you could write it yourself, what would your tombstone say?

“He led with his heart.”

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One word in Edgewise: faster, furrier – where? https://manteobooksellers.com/one-word-in-edgewise-faster-furrier-where/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 03:00:38 +0000 https://manteobooksellers.com/one-word-in-edgewise-faster-furrier-where/ It was another world then. Of course, that’s always the case. If I tell you that mine was slower, calmer, a tall or great will insist that it was more so in their day, and so on until the time when the ancients sat in front of cottages beside languid streams, listening to the changing […]]]>

It was another world then. Of course, that’s always the case. If I tell you that mine was slower, calmer, a tall or great will insist that it was more so in their day, and so on until the time when the ancients sat in front of cottages beside languid streams, listening to the changing of the seasons.

But today, they cling to me. This particular different world. For my first birthday, we took a DC3-powered plane to visit relatives in Mississippi

I boarded my first jet in 1961, alarmed by the flex of those long wings. I thought of the Donners and their long journey. How can I claim slower times after boarding in Boston, fed and watered in the Rockies, and within hours landed dry in San Francisco?

I grew up deprived of electronic devices and instant access to books. Then you went to a library or bookstore hoping she was there. If so, you paid $2-3.50 for a hardback, or 0.25 cents for a paperback, and triumphantly took it home. A store can place a special order, or you can call or write a request to a used bookseller. A writing letter with a stamp. Then wait. I searched for years to replace my (stolen) copy of The Children of Paradise. You kept the books you found.

I searched for the books mentioned in the books. I devoured science fiction, but Theodore Sturgeon A lost world It was the first time I encountered, in popular science fiction, the subject who dared not say his name. The word “homosexual” (not “gay”) was never spoken aloud. I won’t detail the plot here – you can read it for free with just a few clicks.

A longtime team of space jockeys, Captain Rootes, a “colorful little rooster of a man”, and silent Grunty, “a dun bull of a man” whose mind is filled with rivers of words and its cache of books. They bring a pair of captive, criminal “lovebirds” back to their home planet, Dirbanu.

As the ship’s flight changes, everyone on board passes out; Rootes for several hours, huge Grunty for much less. It’s time to read, and gaze at his sleeping Captain… One day, Rootes throws away Grunty’s books, searching in vain for something spicy; “Holy shit! Plynck Garden, Wind in the willows … Child stuff!

[Grunty realizes the “loverbirds” are telepathic receivers. They know his secret. They must die. Not part of this Edge.]

I wanted to visit The Plynck Garden; the only copy I could find was buried deep in the stacks of the Widener Library. I checked it out and photostated a black and white copy of Karle Wilson Baker’s gem. I learned later that it was the only children’s book printed by Yale University Press (1920), most of which had been destroyed.

Today I googled and discovered several versions available – shipped free from the UK, bought online here, dropped them on my Kindle.

Fast or slow, what’s better? A boon for bibliophiles, but are we now traveling above our human carrying capacity? Will we ever answer Grunty’s “Why must we love where lightning strikes and not where we choose” question?

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Dele Weds Destiny Tracks Female Friendship Over Time – Chicago Magazine https://manteobooksellers.com/dele-weds-destiny-tracks-female-friendship-over-time-chicago-magazine/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 18:48:29 +0000 https://manteobooksellers.com/dele-weds-destiny-tracks-female-friendship-over-time-chicago-magazine/ Currently living in Brooklyn and working as an associate culture editor at BuzzFeed News, Tomi Obaro has ties to Windy City. A graduate of the University of Chicago, she also worked in Chicago Readerand served as associate editor at Chicago magazine for about three years. In his first novel, Dele marries destinyreleased in June with […]]]>

Currently living in Brooklyn and working as an associate culture editor at BuzzFeed News, Tomi Obaro has ties to Windy City. A graduate of the University of Chicago, she also worked in Chicago Readerand served as associate editor at Chicago magazine for about three years. In his first novel, Dele marries destinyreleased in June with Knopf, the Nigerian-American author tells the intertwined stories of Enitan, Zainab and Funmi, unlikely friends who bonded while attending university in Zaria.

Tomi Obaro Photo by Reginald Eldridge, Jr.

Thirty years after this period of indivisible intimacy – decades during which they led decidedly different lives – the three women reunite in Lagos for the wedding of Funmi’s daughter, Destiny. As they travel and prepare for the lavish celebration, they reflect on their shared and separate stories and dreams, their betrayals and loyalties. By the time of the novel’s surprising climax, Obaro delivered an intense and incidentally rich exploration of friendship, culture, class, and love.

How did you decide to tell the story using a rotating point of view, letting the reader see the events through each of the eyes of the “trio”? What does it allow you to do that a single perspective wouldn’t?

It was mostly an organic decision for me; I knew I wanted to write from the perspective of Enitan, Funmi, and Zainab as soon as I thought of the characters. And writing from multiple perspectives is inherently more interesting for me too; there’s more room for my imagination when I don’t feel limited to just one character.

You open the book with pictures of food – “they’re eating something out of frame, pounded yam, maybe, or maybe eba” – and cooking features prominently throughout. I love how it both situates the reader in Nigerian culture and how it makes me imagine book clubs serving some of the dishes at their meetings. When book clubs discuss this story, what do you most hope they talk about and why?

I have no set expectations; I just hope it sparks a lot of conversation!

You say early on that women are “essentially sisters” and that seems to be one of the most crucial motives. Why focus so keenly on friendship and this notion of metaphorical brotherhood?

I’ve always been drawn to novels about lasting friendships and their evolution over time. And I was also inspired by the relationship my mother has with her two best friends. I also thought it would be fun to structure the book around a wedding, but have the heart of the novel really focus on friendships – as opposed to romantic love, which gets disproportionate attention.

The various mother-daughter relationships between these women are often strained, and you show how younger women are sometimes better able to get support and advice from older women who aren’t necessarily related by blood. How did you manage to write so convincingly about youth and middle age, and about these intergenerational dynamics?

Thanks for thinking I made it! I really tried to write from a place of empathy for each character, even though the portrayals might seem a bit unflattering.

What other novels or novelists did you draw inspiration from while writing?

I researched domestic fiction by African women writers. I read the semi-autobiographical novel by Buchi Emecheta second-class citizen and Mariama Ba’s Such a long letter, for example. Both of these books are brutally honest about the reality of being a woman in the times they are set and both authors wrote later in life, which I personally found inspiring.

How long did it take you to write this novel, and how did you reconcile your obligations as a publisher with your own creative project?

I started writing it in the summer of 2019 and finished in the spring of 2020. In the beginning, I was very motivated and just wrote when and where I could; on my phone on the train, after work and before work. Then, after that first initial adrenaline rush, I had to force myself to be more disciplined about it. But because editing isn’t writing, it was pretty easy to juggle the two. I didn’t feel like I was using the same part of my brain when I was writing in the morning.

You describe Lagos in loving but critical detail, painting an image of the city as a physical space, but also as an emblem of energy and vitality, of class inequality and resentment, of beauty and abjection. Has the city always been so important in the book to the point where it’s almost as important and realistic as the characters?

Yes, I knew Lagos would fit in the book. It’s such a chaotic place and it felt natural to place parts of the book there.

What’s next, if you can tell?

I’m working on a novel that’s mostly set in Chicago, actually!

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Positive impact through philanthropy – CEOWORLD magazine https://manteobooksellers.com/positive-impact-through-philanthropy-ceoworld-magazine/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 02:11:27 +0000 https://manteobooksellers.com/positive-impact-through-philanthropy-ceoworld-magazine/ Ronald L. Book has long been a powerhouse in Florida’s political and business arenas, representing diverse clients ranging from Fortune 500 companies to local governments. With over 30 years of professional experience, he combines his legislative expertise with his passion for philanthropy. Book has been involved with over 20 charities across Florida and is currently […]]]>

Ronald L. Book has long been a powerhouse in Florida’s political and business arenas, representing diverse clients ranging from Fortune 500 companies to local governments. With over 30 years of professional experience, he combines his legislative expertise with his passion for philanthropy. Book has been involved with over 20 charities across Florida and is currently president of the Lauren’s Kids Foundation and the Miami-Dade Homeless Trust.

Lauren’s children

After discovering nearly two decades ago that his daughter, Lauren Book, had been sexually abused by their live-in nanny, Ron and Lauren fought an incredible fight to end childhood sexual abuse. In 2007, Ron Book helped found Lauren’s Kids alongside his daughter, State Senator Lauren Book. Lauren’s Kids is a non-profit organization that strives to educate and raise awareness about the realities and significance of childhood sexual abuse. The nonprofit created Safer, Smarter Schools, a school program for students of all grades, to learn about personal safety and sexual abuse prevention. Lessons are designed to teach students how to recognize, prevent and protect themselves from sexual abuse. Today, Lauren’s Kids empowers students to protect their personal boundaries in more than 90,000 classrooms across 40 states.

Since 2003, Ron Book and his daughter entered the halls of the Florida Legislative Assembly tirelessly fight for victims of sexual abuse by passing laws that protect Florida children and families. Together, they advocated for nearly two dozen legislative victories ranging from funding sexual assault treatment centers and access to trained counselors and professionals to criminalizing cyber sexual harassment.

Miami-Dade Homeless Trust

Former mayor Alex Penelas appointed Ron Book as President of the Miami-Dade Homeless Trust, the primary agency for homeless people in Broward County. Since Ron’s involvement 25 years ago, his leadership and hard work have earned him the Trust’s National Best Practice Model on several occasions. Recently, the Trust became one of the first in the United States to announce an end to veteran homelessness in their community.

In conjunction with The M Network, the Trust developed the “I don’t need spare change. I Need Real Change,” which focuses on funding long-term action to address homelessness. Currently, the Trust is implementing the Miami-Dade County Community Homeless Plan: Priority Home which establishes a framework of policies and programs to end homelessness. Since 2020, the Trust has made more than 7,300 housing references.

Influential Florida lobbyist, philanthropist and businessman Ron’s Book spent decades specializing in government affairs. Book is a well-established Florida lobbyist-attorney who has represented a long list of clients, including corporations, local governments, school boards, sports teams, and more. He taps into his vast networking community and is an influential figure in Florida politics. Book extends his passion for philanthropy by being involved with charities such as Lauren’s Kids, Miami-Dade Homeless Trust, Mourning Family Foundation, Best Buddies and Joe DiMaggio’s Children’s Hospital.


Written by Ron Book.
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Follow the latest news live on CEOWORLD magazine and get news updates from the United States and around the world. The opinions expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of CEOWORLD magazine.


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Chapter 1.55: The Blue Note https://manteobooksellers.com/chapter-1-55-the-blue-note/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 09:33:16 +0000 https://manteobooksellers.com/chapter-1-55-the-blue-note/ Listen to this article REMARK: This chapter is available as an audiobook at the TLHOC podcast.Access previous chapters of the book on the Table of Contents page. June 7, 8:00 a.m. Billy had spent the previous evening going from bar to bar, trying to find a place that had a television on and listening to […]]]>
Listen to this article

REMARK: This chapter is available as an audiobook at the TLHOC podcast.
Access previous chapters of the book on the Table of Contents page.

June 7, 8:00 a.m.

Billy had spent the previous evening going from bar to bar, trying to find a place that had a television on and listening to the news. Unfortunately, the night had been frustrating, and when the bars closed at 1 a.m., he was no closer to identifying the bearded ghost than he had been when the FedEx truck vanished the man at South Temple.

He considered finding a private home with a late-night news junkie. But he realized that at this time of night there would be no more local news shows to watch. And watching CNN all night wouldn’t give him any leads. So he had been waiting for dawn, simply walking the streets of downtown Salt Lake City.

When the sun came up, he found himself at the Blue Note Diner.

The Blue Note was a small dive from a place just off State Street, with only a dozen tables, and a clientele of mostly firefighters and construction workers from downtown. What they lacked in quality, they more than made up for in quantity, with what they shamelessly called their “heart attack on a plate”: a bed of shredded hash browns, topped with two boiled eggs order, two strips of bacon, two pieces of sausage, white sauce and melted cheese. The meal included coffee and you could get a third egg for an extra dollar. The whole thing was more greasy than anything else, but it kept the construction guys going until lunch.

Billy hadn’t eaten since 1857. Yet the smell of the place and the look of those heavy, steaming white dishes reminded him of what it was like to be hungry.

There was a handwritten sign on the wall next to the TV, which was always on. He read:

WELCOME TO THE BLUE NOTE:
Our food is hot and cheap, and
our waitresses are never in trouble
say about anyone.*
*except Democrats

What attracted Billy was the TV above the bar, and Hazel; the matronly head waitress who worked at the Blue Note most mornings. Indeed, as far as Billy could tell from visiting the Blue Note from time to time over the years, Hazel has really did not henot having a bad say about anyone (and that included Democrats, too). But he was also a tough old bird who couldn’t stand any stupidity. She was the one who decided what was on TV, and at least in the morning it was more than likely the local news.

The joint was full this morning, and it forced Billy to climb and stand on the lunch counter to avoid being bounced around like a pinball machine. Even then, he had to dance around Hazel’s wet washcloth every few minutes.

It didn’t bother him. The view put his face a few feet in front of the television. And it wasn’t like he had to worry about blocking anyone’s view.

Billy watched the parade of horrors on the morning news, recounting the disturbing series of tragedies that had befallen the city over the past few days. The main story, as he expected, was the series of murders at the Valley Fair Mall. He learned the name of the man everyone had identified as the author, Bradley Seward, and that he was a pilot at Dugway. There was a photo of a reporter trying to talk to the family outside a house in Salt Lake City, but they rushed past the reporters without speaking.

Billy knew the real culprit wasn’t this man named Seward. But a little girl named Mattie.

The news anchor moved on, as if relieved to be talking about something other than the massacre. But the other stories were equally gruesome. In addition to the massacre, there had been a wave of suicides at a local school, an attack on a retirement home and even two small children who had thrown themselves under a train. He could hear the tension in the voices of reporters, trying to make sense of the violence.

Thisthat happens, he was thinking. And thatis happening much faster than Tuilla ever anticipated.

Conversation between customers confirmed that he wasn’t the only one who noticed. There were two older men at his feet, and as the story of the two children and the train played out on the screen, he heard their conversation. On the one hand, it sounded like typical old man banter, and one actually said, “None of this happened twenty years ago.” But despite their dismissive words, Billy could hear genuine fear and anxiety in their voices. They too knew that what was happening was far from normal.

And then Billy glanced at the screen and saw it.

It was the bearded ghost! His photo next to a passport photo of a teenager. And there was a name on the chyron under the photos: Hearing scheduled in the murder of Richard Pratt.

Richard Pratt, Billy thought, repeating the name several times to cement it in his memory.

So now he had a name for the ghost. Billy had never doubted he had been murdered, from the blood on the man’s sweatshirt. But the boy pictured next to him didn’t look the type to kill.

Billy concentrated on the reporter’s words.

“…I learned from this morning’s court filing that Howard Gunderson will have his first appearance and formal arraignment at Matheson Courthouse tomorrow. Unfortunately, we still have no news from the SLPD as to the possible motive for the murder of Richard Pratt, who was a respected faculty member of the University of Utah’s linguistics department. Unofficially, we have learned from sources that the murder may have been random and may have been committed as part of a gang initiation ritual…”

Richard Pratt.

Matheson Courthouse. Tomorrow.

Billy engraved these key facts in his memory. Of course, there was no guarantee that Richard Pratt would be at this hearing, but it was a good place to start looking. Sometimes ghosts needed to figure out what had happened to them. And since this man’s death was clearly sudden, he was probably still confused. If he knew about this hearing, there was a good chance he was there.

At least, thought Billy, I can find a cop or a detective there, then follow them. Maybe someone could lead me to Richard Pratt.

Maybe he was wrong. Maybe Richard Pratt couldn’t stop what was coming. But he was the only vague hope Billy had, so he was determined to follow him.

Billy left the restaurant, just avoiding impact with Hazel and her platter of four heart attack specials. He effortlessly jumped out the front window and landed barefoot on the sidewalk outside.

Walking down State Street, he encountered the ghost of a young woman he had seen many times before. Billy thought she must be dead somewhere in that neighborhood, because she was still on the busy sidewalks of State Street. In fact, he had seen her there, on and off, for at least half a century.

He stopped to talk to her.

It was a ritual for him. He was always talking to the ghosts who seemed to be the most lost, the most desperate. He never gave up hope that the lost could answer him. But he had only succeeded a handful of times, and most of the crazed ghosts couldn’t see or hear him, or ran away in terror.

As was usually the case, this ghost could neither see nor speak to him. She just dragged herself along the sidewalk, being roughly jostled from side to side by passers-by.

Billy hoped she would someday find a quiet place, before she was reset again. Which had probably happened dozens of times already. Busy streets weren’t safe places for ghosts, especially those who hadn’t yet found their way or had gone mad. In time, maybe this girl would go to one of the safest places for ghosts to congregate: parks, libraries, warehouses… And of course, cemeteries. Anywhere would be much safer for this lost ghost than a busy downtown street.

Of course, it was also possible that she was simply doing what many others had done over the years. She wandered out of Salt Lake City and into the desert, seeking isolation. Billy had seen many of them standing in groups of twos and threes, still and silent on the white expanse of the Salt Flats, staring at the sun, motionless for decades at a stretch.

Billy watched the young ghost until she was out of sight.

The Last Fistful of Clubs is a supernatural thriller by Wess Mongo Jolley. Thanks for reading! If you like this story, please consider supporting the author on Patreon.

For more information (including story world maps and contact form) visit the author’s website.

To read the previous chapters of this book, go to the Table of Contents page.

If you are interested in listen at the book, rather than reading it, the audiobook is available on the Patreon link above, and also as a podcast on itunes, embroiderer, Anchor, and all other podcast platforms. Visit the podcast for more details.

ADDITIONAL LINKS:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WessMongoJolley
Twitter: https://twitter.com/WessMongoJolley
Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/mongobearwolf

Copyright 2021, Wess Mongo Jolley. All rights reserved.

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Wendy Wu will perform her first Japan tour in July https://manteobooksellers.com/wendy-wu-will-perform-her-first-japan-tour-in-july/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 14:50:45 +0000 https://manteobooksellers.com/wendy-wu-will-perform-her-first-japan-tour-in-july/ Japan is finally reopening to British tourists tomorrow (Friday June 10), ending a travel ban that lasted nearly three years to curb the spread of Covid-19 After 18 months of consultation with the Japanese government and the Japanese National Tourist Board, Wendy Wu Tours – which flies the largest number of tour groups to Japan […]]]>

Japan is finally reopening to British tourists tomorrow (Friday June 10), ending a travel ban that lasted nearly three years to curb the spread of Covid-19

After 18 months of consultation with the Japanese government and the Japanese National Tourist Board, Wendy Wu Tours – which flies the largest number of tour groups to Japan from the UK, Australia and New Zealand – has received the green light from the Japanese government to make this first official group tour in Japan on July 26, 2022.

It will be one of the first travel agencies allowed to return to Japan after nearly three years of border closures.

Wu’s 11-day, all-inclusive “Jewels of Japan” tour kicks off in July 2022 and is expected to sell out in record time. Visits to Wendy Wu added additional capacity for tours throughout fall 2022 and for March and April 2023, to meet increased demand.

The travel company is offering free flights to Japan and half-price add-ons for individual flights when booked by June 30, 2022. The first couple to book from the UK will be upgraded to higher category rooms in each hotel of the circuit.

“We have received the green light from the Japanese government to resume group tours and have taken the unprecedented decision to add an additional tour date in July, to meet the huge travel demand,” said Wendy Wu, founder of Wendy Wu Tours. .

“Our agents and clients have been calling for a tour date and an opportunity to travel to Japan, ASAP, and so we’re excited to achieve that with this July tour.

“Our customers will be among the first to visit Japan and experience the magic of new Japan at its best. With fewer people in July, it’s the perfect time to travel and discover this spectacular country. Having not had tour groups in so long, the warmth and hospitality our guests will receive in July will be second to none. The tour is fully inclusive and we will take care of everything including visas. It is truly a monumental tour and an opportunity to be the first travelers to return to Japan, after almost three years.

Visit Wendy Wu’s website for more information on tours in Japan, as well as all the details of Wendy Wu’s “Travel with confidence” program. ‘Jewels of Japan’ costs from £5,690 per person.

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The Best Tech CEOs – Tough, Not Acting Tough https://manteobooksellers.com/the-best-tech-ceos-tough-not-acting-tough/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 03:13:22 +0000 https://manteobooksellers.com/the-best-tech-ceos-tough-not-acting-tough/ What are the characteristics of top tech CEOs that make them admired and supported by more than 90% of their staff? At an ever-increasing rate, it’s their ability to communicate a clear vision, relentlessly focus on execution, and stay calm and clear-headed while working through the constant bombardment of pressures and challenges. Apple’s Tim Cook, […]]]>

What are the characteristics of top tech CEOs that make them admired and supported by more than 90% of their staff? At an ever-increasing rate, it’s their ability to communicate a clear vision, relentlessly focus on execution, and stay calm and clear-headed while working through the constant bombardment of pressures and challenges.

Apple’s Tim Cook, Adobe’s Shantanu Narayan, Microsoft’s Satya Nadella and Google’s Sundar Pichai have become permanent fixtures on lists of the world’s most effective and respected CEOs. So what do they have in common? Although they are tough on the inside and full of conviction, they have also learned to be effective leaders through active listening, accurate interpretation of data, use of their strong instincts and effective communication. with confident confidence and a calm voice. It is seldom necessary for them to shout, punch their fists or act harshly outside.

Warren Buffett shared a lesson he learned from Thomas Murphy, the former chairman and CEO of the American Broadcasting Company (ABC), who Buffet calls one of his heroes. Murphy was known to be extremely even and rarely, if ever, raised his voice. His advice to Buffett was, “You can always tell someone to go to hell tomorrow.” The thing is, you don’t waste the opportunity to tell someone how you really feel by giving yourself another day. If it turns out that you feel the same way, tell them then, but don’t say things in a moment of anger that you might end up regretting. Wise words for all of us to live by.

In my book, Decoding your STEM career, I describe my own personal experiences, sometimes having trouble controlling my emotions at work. As a senior executive at IBM, I was responsible for product management of our object-oriented compilers. One of my peers was in charge of strategy. Our jobs overlapped, complicating an already strained relationship. I remember he chased me at a public meeting. I was surprised at first and tried to stay calm, but eventually lost my temper. This is the only time in my career that I remember having participated in a public shouting match with a colleague. Like kindergartners, we were called into the lab director’s office who berated us for doing so in a public meeting, on full screen in front of more junior executives.

Fast forward several years to RIM. I was leading a large organization developing our enterprise products. A colleague of mine ran product management. Even on the best days, we struggled to work together. His team disagreed with many of my team’s design decisions, and our co-lead decided to call a meeting in an effort to find a solution. The meeting didn’t start well as the presentation from the product team was littered with subtle insults and I noticed my team getting visibly upset while listening. Faces grew redder as the meeting progressed, and it became clear that we were heading in a very dangerous direction. I requested that we suspend the meeting so that my peer and I could have a private discussion. We took the opportunity to air our differences, releasing what felt like months of pent up frustration. We were experienced enough to know that direct altercations of this nature should only occur behind closed doors. We also knew it was up to both of us to deal with the rapidly deteriorating situation.

We ended up agreeing on some concessions and a revised working model between our teams. We also agreed to two compromise decisions, each of us getting our way on one of them. We returned to the meeting together, committed to the plan for the future. We were aligned in our communications, we set clear expectations and we asked our teams to follow by turning a new chapter. Our teams started working better together immediately afterwards and we ended up delivering a strong product to market. When I compare the way I handled the situation to my performance at the IBM meeting a decade earlier, I felt a real sense of personal growth.

I learned from my mistakes and also by watching others in action. Studying the leadership styles of the world’s top tech CEOs can be extremely helpful, as long as you commit to staying true to yourself and adapting a leadership style that matches who you are as a person. Tim Cook has a reputation for being open and listening carefully to other people’s ideas. He is known for asking lots of questions and taking all the time he needs to process the answers before making a decision. Shantanu Narayan believes it is essential to lead in a way that harnesses the power of one’s organization to solve problems that others avoid or find too difficult. Satya Nadella takes an empathetic and gentle approach, valuing each employee, encouraging them to perform at their best and fostering a culture of innovation and collaboration. Sundar Pichai is known for his listening skills, for helping others understand difficult concepts, for caring about people, and for avoiding making enemies.

These great leaders understand that it’s their job to strategize, ask tough questions, keep everyone honest, and consistently demonstrate trust and support from their teams. Technologists tend to take pride in their skills and it is important that they are treated with the respect they deserve. For most leaders, excessive use of authority or aggression doesn’t work in the long run. The greatest leaders of our generation have understood this and they have set a shining example for the rest of us. They realize that it’s a technology leader’s job to be the best coach they can be, not to be the team’s jerk or its best player. In the ultra-competitive world of technology, it’s good to know that nice guys can really finish first.


Written by Pete Devenyi.
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Follow the latest news live on CEOWORLD magazine and get news updates from the United States and around the world. The opinions expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of CEOWORLD magazine.


Follow headlines from CEOWORLD magazine on Google News, Twitterand Facebook. For media inquiries, please contact: info@ceoworld.biz

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