Journal – Manteo Book Sellers http://manteobooksellers.com/ Sun, 02 Oct 2022 21:42:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://manteobooksellers.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-manteo.png Journal – Manteo Book Sellers http://manteobooksellers.com/ 32 32 Rosetta Stone moved for the first time in 18 years https://manteobooksellers.com/rosetta-stone-moved-for-the-first-time-in-18-years-2/ Sun, 02 Oct 2022 21:37:59 +0000 https://manteobooksellers.com/rosetta-stone-moved-for-the-first-time-in-18-years-2/ The Rosetta Stone has temporarily moved to a special exhibition at the British Museum to celebrate 200 years since the hieroglyphics were decoded. It is the first time the ancient object has been moved since it was installed in the Egyptian Sculpture Gallery 18 years ago. In 1799, the inscribed slab was discovered by a […]]]>

The Rosetta Stone has temporarily moved to a special exhibition at the British Museum to celebrate 200 years since the hieroglyphics were decoded.

It is the first time the ancient object has been moved since it was installed in the Egyptian Sculpture Gallery 18 years ago.

In 1799, the inscribed slab was discovered by a group of soldiers and later it became the key that unlocked the mysterious hieroglyphic script of ancient Egypt.

The stone will be the focus of the British Museum’s Hieroglyphs: Unlocking Ancient Egypt exhibition which runs from October 13 to February 19.

Exhibition curator Ilona Regulski told the PA news agency: “We are telling the story of the deciphering of Egyptian hieroglyphs that happened 200 years ago, so that is what we are celebrating. .

“The Rosetta Stone is crucial to the history of decipherment because it provided the key to deciphering hieroglyphics.

“We couldn’t really tell the story of deciphering hieroglyphics without the Rosetta Stone, so we decided it would have a good place in the exhibition.

“Furthermore, it gives us the opportunity to contextualize the story a bit better and tell more complete stories about the stone’s role in decipherment, but also about its arrival in the British Museum.”

Ms Regulski said the Rosetta Stone was in the Louvre museum in Paris “for a very brief period” in 1972 and was also moved during World War II for its protection, but has not been moved for 18 years.

Senior Curator Stephanie Vasiliou prepares the Rosetta Stone (Jonathan Brady/PA)

Speaking about the time it took to organize the exhibition, she said: “I think about three years. I think I started doing research in 2019.

“You build the story in your head as a curator, and then at some point, I think a little over a year later, we kind of got the core team together.

“Now it’s quite a large team because we’re building the exhibit. I am very excited.

Ms Regulski, who is also curator of written culture at the British Museum, said they were replacing the Rosetta Stone with a temporary exhibition.

“We are of course taking this opportunity of the empty storefront to do a new display and it’s almost ready,” she said.

“It is an opportunity to rethink this whole exhibition and this space, which is really a crossroads between different cultures of the ancient world.

“We’re using this as a sort of pilot to see how we can approach the history of the different interconnected cultures of the ancient world.”

The immersive display, which will include digital and audio media, will bring together more than 240 objects retracing the race to decipher.

A featured item in the exhibit will feature “the Enchanted Pool” – a large black granite sarcophagus covered in hieroglyphics from around 600 BCE.

Rosetta stone
The Rosetta Stone (Jonathan Brady/PA)

The hieroglyphics were believed to have magical powers and bathing in the basin could offer relief from the torments of love.

Likewise, Queen Nedjmet’s 3,000-year-old Illustrated Book of the Dead will feature alongside a set of canopic vessels that held the organs of the deceased.

It will be the first time a set of jars have been brought together since the 1700s, the museum said.

Aberuait’s mummy bandage from the Louvre Museum in Paris, which has never been displayed in the UK, will also be on display.

Speaking about her aspirations for the exhibit, Ms. Regulski added, “I hope visitors will, of course, learn about ancient Egypt. It’s always a wonderful opportunity to show new research on one of the most amazing ancient civilizations.

“I hope they understand that ancient Egypt was a distant culture but is also relevant to understanding human practices today, we have a lot in common with ancient people.

“I tried to show that by deciphering the hieroglyphics we really get a glimpse of ancient Egypt that wasn’t possible before.

“We understand much better now how ordinary people lived, how they liked to write, because most people couldn’t read or write of course, so they would have enjoyed the written culture by listening to it, by performances and quotes .

“I really hope to get the message across that behind the hieroglyphs there is a spoken language, it was a way to communicate with each other.”

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A 50th memory: This year’s official poster features the Looney Toons https://manteobooksellers.com/a-50th-memory-this-years-official-poster-features-the-looney-toons/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 06:02:22 +0000 https://manteobooksellers.com/a-50th-memory-this-years-official-poster-features-the-looney-toons/ Courtesy of Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta This year’s official Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta poster completes a five-year series. Poster by artist Daniel Killen features the entire cast of Looney Toons characters. Turning 50 is a big deal and to commemorate the event, the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta has a long list of items emblazoned with […]]]>
Courtesy of Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta This year’s official Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta poster completes a five-year series. Poster by artist Daniel Killen features the entire cast of Looney Toons characters.

Turning 50 is a big deal and to commemorate the event, the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta has a long list of items emblazoned with the logo.

“We’ve been trying to get 50 on as many items as possible this year,” said fiesta merchandise manager Lisa Mulder. “It’s quite significant that we started with 13 balls and now we have 650.”

A peek into the fiesta store reveals t-shirts, jackets, pins, calendars, drink containers, puzzles, shot glasses and, of course, posters.

“Probably over 100, which is significantly more than we’ve ever done before,” Mulder said of the product line.

Topping the list are the popular posters, which this year feature the finale of a five-year series with virtually the entire cast of Looney Toons characters sharing space with stars Wily Coyote, the Roadrunner and Bugs Bunny.

Conceived by artist Daniel Killen through the Chuck Jones Gallery, the finale brings the whole gang together in one big Balloon Fiesta celebration.

“We were trying to bring it all back to the loop,” Mulder said. “If you look at the posters from 1972, there are some bright versions. One with the Roadrunner and one with Wily Coyote, of course. So we thought why not do this kind of celebration for the 50th and bring all the characters back in and do something fun and colorful?

And it’s quite symbolic of the party itself, which includes its own colorful cast of characters.

“Absolutely,” she said. “We all have different types of people and characters coming in.”

Signed posters, which will only be available on the fiesta grounds, are $200 and unsigned $150. And a limited number of the previous four posters are also still available, she said.

AIBF logo

Each poster, as well as every 50th item, is adorned with special AIBF tags to allow people to obtain official merchandise, Mulder said.

“Here’s an insider’s tip. One of the problems the Balloon Fiesta has faced in the past is all these other outside bands trying to use our name, trying to capitalize on the event, that sort of thing. Mulder said, “So you’ll see a lot of things from Balloon Fiesta that aren’t trademarked properly because we have a brand event, a brand name.”

But now the “AIBF” logo is incorporated into the designs or sewn on the sleeves of the garments.

“We take the money and put it back into the community and the beautification of the park so it can be used year-round. We do not own the park. So that’s something we tried to do this year to make sure people knew they were getting genuine Balloon Fiesta items.

And some of them are pretty damn cool.

Like the softshell jacket popular every year, which includes the phrase “50th anniversary” inside the zipper protection.

“Softshells are always huge every year,” Mulder said. “We took the 50th design and then put it in the diamond design with the original 13 balloons. It’s hard to show on a lot of pieces but on the jacket it looks great. The balloon at the bottom, which is large, is Sid’s balloon. Sid Cutter, of course.

Jackets are $175. And the old-school varsity letter men’s jacket with a ’72 on the pocket, quilted interior, snaps and an embroidered logo on the back is $200.

“We made a lot of jackets this year, more than we normally would,” she said. “We had fun trying to make the retro varsity jacket stand out. It’s a throwback to Balloon Fiesta 1972.”

Pins, T-shirts

And, of course, it wouldn’t be a fiesta without a special pin. Or many, many pins in this case.

“We have this year – collectors are going to be upset – three 50-year-old pins in different colors,” Mulder said. “The main one is gold, of course, for the 50th. Then in a rainbow version that’s sort of anodized and has this cool effect and made it a turquoise. These all got sold so well that I’m almost sold out, so I ordered some more for the field.

These pins are $15 each and are just the start.

“We did a pink, white and completely different turquoise for the pitch,” she said. “What we tried to make special with the regular retail pins is that the 50 on each are raised and we put one of the original 13 balloons on each pin.”

These pins are $9 each.

The t-shirts are full of Looney Toon-inspired characters that took more than two years of negotiations with Warner Brothers to create.

But modest T-shirts are what Mulder really appreciates.

“I love some of the celebration t-shirts,” she said. “Something simple. We have three different colors with blue and then purple and forest to color them. They have the gold logo on the front and the gold celebration with the mountain and the fireworks and a pop of color on the back.

Each of the t-shirts sells for $30, and the long sleeves are $35.

And that includes Del Sol Color Change shirts that look like regular white shirts until they hit the sun, then UV rays produce colored balloons, Mulder said.

Fiesta fanatics should also keep a few pounds in mind. The Guinness Book of World Records includes the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta for the “largest mass balloon ascent”, with 524, in 2019.

And the photo-rich “50 Years of Balloon Magic” coffee table book, which includes sections on all aspects of the party like Dawn Patrol, Balloon Glow, Special Shape Rodeo, Glodeo and America’s Challenge, as well as a special tribute to Sid Cutter.

The book, written by Paul Rhetts, Dick Brown, Tom McConnell and Kim Vesely, will sell for $45 at the party lot.

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Vintage Guys – Los Angeles Business Journal https://manteobooksellers.com/vintage-guys-los-angeles-business-journal/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 07:05:48 +0000 https://manteobooksellers.com/vintage-guys-los-angeles-business-journal/ Palms-based 1933 Group is behind some of Los Angeles’ most iconic historic renovations.More recently, the company opened Tail o’ the Pup, a giant hot dog stand that dates back to the 1940s in West Hollywood. Tail o’ the Pup in West Hollywood. (Photo by Ringo Chiu) The original Tail o’ the Pup closed in 2005. […]]]>

Palms-based 1933 Group is behind some of Los Angeles’ most iconic historic renovations.
More recently, the company opened Tail o’ the Pup, a giant hot dog stand that dates back to the 1940s in West Hollywood.

Tail o’ the Pup in West Hollywood. (Photo by Ringo Chiu)

The original Tail o’ the Pup closed in 2005. Bobby Green, who founded 1933 Group with Dimitri Komarov and Dmitry Liberman, said he was contacted by a friend of his who ran a museum to which the booth was donated. His friend put Green in touch with the owners of Tail o’ the Pup, who decided to sell the giant hot dog and the name to 1933 Group instead.

Tail o’ the Pup in West Hollywood. (Photo by Ringo Chiu)

“Even though we’ve never done fast food or fast casual, we didn’t think it was too different from what we normally do,” Green said. Most of the group’s other projects have focused on bars and hospitality.

Green said finding a good location was the “key factor” in reviving the restaurant.
Due to the pandemic, he said, more locations became available and Tail o’ the Pup was able to find a place in the heart of West Hollywood.

Other projects

1933 Group has carried out nearly ten restorations since its creation in 1998 with the aim of opening a bar.
Green, who previously owned a cafe, said he was still interested in owning a bar. He bonded with Komarov and Liberman, and thus began 1933 Group’s first project: Bigfoot Lodge in Atwater Village.

Highland Park Bowl after its renovation.

The company quickly grew by opening more locations.
“We were on a roll,” Green said. “We opened a new establishment every year and a half and at the time it was strictly bars.”

Green said all of the band’s initial ventures were “vintage-inspired” places. Soon after, the company began to work more on true vintage restorations.
“It wasn’t until we had the opportunity with Idle Hour in North Hollywood that we had the chance to restore a truly vintage venue rather than recreate a vintage venue,” Green said. The group spent $2 million to renovate the property, best known for its giant barrel exterior.

A file image of the Highland Park Bowl building.

Other restoration projects followed, such as the $2.5 million renovation of Highland Park Bowl, a 1920s bowling alley that Green said was the oldest bowling alley in Los Angeles.
“Restoration costs double or triple what it costs to build something new,” Green said.

“There is great satisfaction in doing this and great benefits, but it also comes at a cost. Renovation costs more than new construction, but for us it does not matter. The passion is greater than the cost burden and we try to find ways to make it worth it in the end.
Generally speaking, Green said he likes to “stick to what I know,” which is why he hasn’t done any theater or department store renovations.

“The cinemas we refused. We would have to completely learn how to run a theater and book events. We stick to hospitality and try not to stray too far from that,” he said.
For now, Green said the company has no plans to start a new project in the short term, but rather is “tunneling through Tail o’ the Pup and perfecting it.”

Formosa as it looked from its original opening.

“At the moment we don’t have a project on the horizon, which is absolutely fine,” he said. “We still have to lick our wounds and keep the places we have and build them and perfect them and get the business back to what it was before we started leveraging ourselves and taking on more projects.”

The interior of Formosa after renovation.

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Time travellers: Couple recreate 1922 trip from Trafalgar to California https://manteobooksellers.com/time-travellers-couple-recreate-1922-trip-from-trafalgar-to-california/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 20:11:00 +0000 https://manteobooksellers.com/time-travellers-couple-recreate-1922-trip-from-trafalgar-to-california/ The Model T raced down the dirt road of Trafalgar Farm with one goal – California or the bust. Iliff and Oma Mitchell, joined by Iliff’s father and sister, set out on October 13, 1922, determined to drive from Indiana to winter in the temperate climate of the San Bernadino Valley. They would cross the […]]]>

The Model T raced down the dirt road of Trafalgar Farm with one goal – California or the bust.

Iliff and Oma Mitchell, joined by Iliff’s father and sister, set out on October 13, 1922, determined to drive from Indiana to winter in the temperate climate of the San Bernadino Valley.

They would cross the Mississippi River on a ferry, endure the endless horizon of the Great Plains, brave the peaks of the Rockies before reaching Southern California. The journey was long, slow and difficult. But they did, documenting every step of the 19-day excursion with photographs and descriptions.

Their perseverance is legendary in the Mitchell family and fascinated their grandson, Craig Mitchell.

“It was 19 days of hard driving to get there, and no one in their right mind would get in a Model T and drive on dirt roads for 19 days unless they really, really want to get there,” did he declare. . “I learn so much more about my grandparents from this.”

One hundred years to the day, Mitchell and his wife, Kathy, are following in his grandparents’ footsteps across the United States. The couple plan to depart Oct. 13 from the same Trafalgar farm that served as a starting point for Iliff and Oma Mitchell in 1922, then chart a course to Redlands, California, staying as close to the same path as possible.

The Mitchells are able to do so thanks to the information transmitted by Oma Mitchell during the initial trip. In a similar vein, they plan to use social media to record their own journeys, in the hope that future generations of the family can relive it as well.

“I want my great-grandchildren to be able to do this trip again if they want to, and have a lot of the history already,” Craig Mitchell said.

Iliff and Oma had only been married for weeks in 1922 when they embarked on their journey. They would spend their honeymoon traveling to stay with Iliff Mitchell’s aunt, who lived in California, and stay over the winter to work on a farm.

They intended to do it in 19 days, to beat the snow in the mountains, said Craig Mitchell.

On their return trip in the summer of 1923, they took a more relaxed approach, touring and meandering across the country with stops at Yosemite and Yellowstone National Parks.

Their starting point was the family farm just off present-day State Road 252 in Trafalgar, although it looked very different at the time, said Nolan Mitchell, Iliff and Oma’s son and father. by Craig Mitchell.

“There was barely a road,” he said.

For most of the trip, they would follow the Pike’s Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway – a route that stretched from New York to Los Angeles through the heartland. At each stop, they camped.

They could only travel about 200 km a day, in a car without heating, air conditioning, windows or windshield wipers.

“They were tough old birds,” said Craig Mitchell.

Oma Mitchell had received a camera as a graduation present in 1916 and used it to take pictures along the way. She captured the sparse canvas tent used for camping in Rockville, Illinois on the first night of their trip. Another photograph showed an adobe building that served as a school in Arizona.

The group posed next to a mass of petrified trees in Arizona – the only sightseeing stop they made on their trip to California.

Oma Mitchell also jotted down a sentence or two each day, documenting mileage or any unique event that happened. Thanks to her, the family know they had to stay at a hotel in Flagstaff, Arizona when they got stuck in 14 inches of snow. And they know the group was pulled over for speeding in Kansas – impressive, since the Model T had no odometer and could only reach about 35 miles per hour.

“It cost them $10, or about 8% of the total amount it cost them for those 19 days,” Craig Mitchell said.

The photographs and notes from the trip had been passed on to their son, Nolan Mitchell, Craig’s father. About six years ago, Nolan Mitchell and his family wrote a little book about travel.

The collection stirred something at Craig Mitchell.

“I thought, well, it’ll be 100 years in 2022, and that’s about when I was retiring. So let’s make the trip,” he said. thought I’d like to do that, be where they were 100 years to the day.”

Other family members had been to the places where Iliff and Oma Mitchell stopped on their journey, but no one had made it all in a straight line following their route.

Committed to the plan, Craig Mitchell had to work out the details. He started by convincing his wife, who had to arrange to work remotely during the trip.

Their plan was to go from town to town like Iliff and Oma Mitchell did, staying at the same stops along the way.

To take them to California, the Mitchells opted for a 29-foot trailer pulled by an SUV – there would be no Model T for them.

“It doesn’t say silly on my forehead,” said Craig Mitchell.

The Mitchells have also contacted newspapers, museums and libraries in the communities they will stop in along the way. Many expressed interest in meeting with them, and a library in Scandia, Kansas asked if they would be willing to do a program.

Meeting all the different people will be meaningful, Kathy Mitchell said.

“I don’t know if I look at the ‘what’ as much as the ‘who’,” she said. “That sense of community really appeals to me.”

Although the original thoughts were to have their grandchildren travel with them, the logistics of removing them from school would be too difficult. So instead, the grandchildren will join parts of the trip.

“So between my great-grandfather on the original trip and our grandchildren on this one, there will be six generations of family that have done this,” Craig Mitchell said.

They also record their activities on social networks – Facebook, YouTube, Instagram and website. They named him “Follow the Papaw”, a nod to the Mitchell grandchildren’s nickname to their grandfathers over the years.

They have started posting on Facebook and will start posting on YouTube when they leave.

“It’s not so much about becoming active in this area. It’s not that I want to be famous. But I wanted to document this trip the same way my grandmother documented it,” said Craig Mitchell. “Images are beautiful, but if I can film them, we can capture a lot more meaning.”

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‘Incredibly disappointing:’ Governor DeWine and Vance say no to debates https://manteobooksellers.com/incredibly-disappointing-governor-dewine-and-vance-say-no-to-debates/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 09:06:03 +0000 https://manteobooksellers.com/incredibly-disappointing-governor-dewine-and-vance-say-no-to-debates/ Republican candidates for the U.S. Senate and Ohio governor’s office have refused to face off against their opponents in a debate, organizers said Wednesday. Incumbent Gov. Mike DeWine and U.S. Senate candidate JD Vance will not appear at forums scheduled for October hosted by the Ohio Debate Commission, an independent organization with ties to state […]]]>

Republican candidates for the U.S. Senate and Ohio governor’s office have refused to face off against their opponents in a debate, organizers said Wednesday.

Incumbent Gov. Mike DeWine and U.S. Senate candidate JD Vance will not appear at forums scheduled for October hosted by the Ohio Debate Commission, an independent organization with ties to state media. The gubernatorial race now has no debate on the horizon, and the Senate race doesn’t seem much more optimistic on the subject.

“We’re obviously disappointed,” ODC board chairman Dan Moulthrop said.

“This election year has been plagued by candidates from both parties who prioritize the input of their campaign consultants over the information needs of voters. When 84% of Ohioans say they want debates and campaigns turn down a bona fide offer from a statewide organization, democracy pays the price.

In both races, the Democratic candidates have lambasted their rivals’ apparent reluctance to debate in public – without the filter of political managers or the media. Both pointed to a recent USA TODAY Network Ohio/Suffolk University poll indicating that 84% of Ohioans want to see their candidates debate.

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Nan Whaley has criticized DeWine’s refusal to debate and her evasive statements on the subject in recent weeks. DeWine said his openness to interviews, newspaper editorial meetings and decades in office was enough for voters.

The prognosis for the debate in the Senate is rather a mess.

Ryan publicly accepted and challenged Vance to three debates hosted by the ODC, Youngstown area news station WFMJ-TV, and Cincinnati news station WLWT.

Vance dismissed the ODC debate, with a spokesperson calling the moderator “a liberal donor to Tim Ryan who has repeatedly and publicly smeared Republicans.” On Monday, in the hours before the deadline to respond to the ODC’s debate invitation, two conservative news outlets ran stories chronicling the moderator’s story of contributing $250 to Tim Ryan in 2014 and running for office. as a Democrat in 2014 and 2016. FEC records show the moderator, Jill Zimon, stopped donating to politicians in 2018.

Meanwhile, WFMJ invited the two Senate candidates to debate in July. Ryan accepted. Not Vance.

“We have no feedback or response from the Vance campaign as to whether or not they are interested,” news director Mona Alexander said.

The Vance campaign declined to comment on the WFMJ case.

As for WLWT, the candidates do not agree on the date. Ryan has publicly announced that he will be participating in the WLWT debate on October 4. Vance, a few days later, said he would participate in the WLWT debate on a date yet to be determined. However, he agreed to participate in a debate organized by Nexstar, which owns several television news stations in Ohio, also scheduled for October 4.

Ryan’s campaign said he would not participate in the Nexstar debate because he had already committed to the WLWT event. In a statement, he accused Vance of trying to “double book” as an excuse. Vance declined to comment on the WLWT event.

Jeff Benscoter, chief information officer for WLWT, said in an email that the two campaigns have “formally agreed to debate WLWT,” but are still finalizing a date.

A Nexstar spokesperson did not respond to an inquiry.

Whaley and Ryan both expressed frustration with the lack of debate – a long-standing tradition in American politics.

“It’s incredibly disappointing. I’ve accepted that and many other debates across Ohio,” Whaley said. “I guess Mike DeWine is too loose to defend his record. Ohio deserves better.

A DeWine spokesperson did not respond to an inquiry.

Ryan’s campaign, in a statement, criticized Vance, noting that he participated in an ODC debate during the Republican primary.

“Tim Ryan remains more eager than ever to debate JD Vance, but for that to happen, JD needs to stop hiding from debate organizers and trying to withdraw from forums both candidates have already engaged in,” said Ryan’s campaign manager Dave Chase. in a report. “All we want is for JD and his team to stop playing games and have the courtesy to respond to these reputable media outlets trying to give Ohio voters the fair debate they deserve.”

The refusal to debate publicly follows the steady decline of democratic standards on the political right. Republicans have also refused Senate debates across the country. The New York Times reports that four Republican-controlled states (including Ohio) will hold elections this year on redistricting maps that their state supreme courts have ruled unconstitutional. Polls from various universities over the past two years have found that between 60% and 80% of Republicans mistakenly believe the election was stolen – a claim echoed by Vance. Republican U.S. state legislatures in 2021 passed dozens of voter restrictions on mail-in voting, voter registration, voter ID requirements, and more.

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Publication of an intuition encouragement book and a spiritual mindfulness motivation book https://manteobooksellers.com/publication-of-an-intuition-encouragement-book-and-a-spiritual-mindfulness-motivation-book/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 06:07:51 +0000 https://manteobooksellers.com/publication-of-an-intuition-encouragement-book-and-a-spiritual-mindfulness-motivation-book/ Connected Spirit Publications, has released a new short digital book by Cliff Taylor titled Clear Calm & Open. The company, founded by Mr. Taylor, publishes books and stories focusing on the connection between mind, body and spirit. Houston, USA – September 21, 2022 — With the release of Clear Calm & Open, Connected Spirit Publications […]]]>

Connected Spirit Publications, has released a new short digital book by Cliff Taylor titled Clear Calm & Open. The company, founded by Mr. Taylor, publishes books and stories focusing on the connection between mind, body and spirit.

With the release of Clear Calm & Open, Connected Spirit Publications brings the teachings of Clif Taylor to readers looking for methods to eliminate stress and achieve greater balance in life and business.

For more information, please visit https://www.cliftaylor.com/product/clear-calm-and-open

Clear Calm & Open is the latest release from the company. The book offers readers Clif Taylor’s three-step wellness and healing technique for mind, body, and spirit.

Prior to founding Connected Spirit Publications, Taylor had a successful thirty-five year career in the oil industry. His work took him all over the world, and he quickly sought to share his methods combining entrepreneurship and mindfulness. His first book, Connect, was published in 2006 and launched Connected Spirit Publications. Since then, the company has published dozens of fiction and non-fiction books for adults and children.

The most recent release, Clear Calm & Open, helps readers build a stronger connection with themselves and others, building on concepts established in Taylor’s first book.

In the new 30-page digital book, Clif Taylor seeks to increase each reader’s ability to discover new solutions that improve the quality of everyday life. The three-step technique of Clear, Calm & Open is drawn from the practices of yoga, prayer and meditation and is made easily accessible by the author. Auxiliary training and education is available through podcasts, webinars and personal training sessions.

Clear Calm & Open is available in PDF format and supports Connected Spirit Publications’ core mission of creating captivating, beautiful, and revealing books and stories. More details are available at https://www.cliftaylor.com

A spokesperson for the publishing house said, “Collectively, when you practice mindfulness through the Clear, Calm and Open technique, you begin to experience increased clarity that removes internal and external distractions; being in this state naturally guides you towards dissolving obstacles, realizing answers to questions, resolving conflicts, and taking the next steps to overcome challenges.

Interested parties can find more details on Connected Spirit Publications as well as Clif Taylor’s recent post on

Clear Calm & Open ℠ (PDF)

Contact information:
Name: Clif Taylor
Email: Send email
Organization: Connected Spirit Publications
Address: 7114 Halfpenny Road, Houston, Texas 79055, USA
Website: https://www.cliftaylor.com

Build ID: 89081938

If you detect any problems, problems or errors in the content of this press release, please contact [email protected] to let us know. We will respond and rectify the situation within the next 8 hours.

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Edmonton-born dancer directs ballet adaptation of The Handmaid’s Tale https://manteobooksellers.com/edmonton-born-dancer-directs-ballet-adaptation-of-the-handmaids-tale/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 17:10:44 +0000 https://manteobooksellers.com/edmonton-born-dancer-directs-ballet-adaptation-of-the-handmaids-tale/ Breadcrumb Links Theater local arts Alanna McAdie stars as Offred, the protagonist of Margaret Atwood’s harrowing dystopian tale Publication date : Sep 20, 2022 • 48 minutes ago • 4 minute read • Join the conversation Alanna McAdie will perform the role of Offred in the ballet A Handmaid’s Tale. Photo by David Cooper /Provided […]]]>

Alanna McAdie stars as Offred, the protagonist of Margaret Atwood’s harrowing dystopian tale

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Alanna McAdie has a hard time letting go of Offred when she steps off stage.

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The Edmonton-born dancer previously performed the role of island protagonist and narrator in The Handmaid’s Tale, the Royal Winnipeg Ballet’s adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s harrowing dystopian tale. It is the story of a futuristic society, called the Republic of Gilead, ruled by an oppressor, totalitarian, religious right military theocracy. Fertile women are forced to produce children for the commanders, the male ruling class. Her character, like many women in the story, is a sex slave whose name literally means she is the property of her commander. It’s a dark and violent world, but McAdie says inhabiting the role is anything but daunting.

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“I love playing Offred,” says the dancer, who will perform the role again with the Royal Winnipeg Ballet as part of Alberta Ballet’s season at the Northern Jubilee Auditorium in Edmonton from September 22-24. “I really feel empowered at the end. There’s a lot that Offred has to go through and it’s almost hard to disconnect from it. At the end of the first act, there is a rather aggressive scene with the Commander. I find that when you play and be part of this performance, you don’t come out of it. But towards the end of the ballet, you start to get really angry and take responsibility for the whole story. I think every time I dance the role, starting at the beginning of the book and telling the whole thing, it’s pretty cathartic.

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“I think when Lila first did the ballet, just before the TV show, I think she was diving into something that was recurring,” McAdie says. “It was the beginning of Donald Trump and it was shaping up to become a similar storyline and it was very relevant again. The TV show obviously made it more relevant and all the #MeToo stuff, all that movement, and now abortion rights in the United States, I think that’s extremely relevant and I think that’s going to be pretty timeless Her writing is dystopian but she picks things up and down but those are long term issues – there are environmental things – I think it’s important that we find ways that art can provide an outlet for those things.

York began speaking with Andre Lewis, artistic director and CEO of the Royal Winnipeg Ballet, years before she started working there.

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“I remember how much (the book) affected me when I first read it,” York says. “I had nightmares, really. That moment when (Offred) first tried to use his bank card to buy a cup of coffee and can’t because his bank card was canceled and all his money was given to her husband, so she has no money at all. She has no access to money. Single women, all the money went to the government. Without money, they could not not work. It hit me like a bomb. It was so real to me.

Difficult adjustment

When Lewis approved the idea years later, York wrote a script, asked for and received Atwood’s approval, and began translating key scenes into ballet motion to “give it some sort of subconscious color so that it is not merely a literal retelling of the novel. It has many other aspects. »

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Still, adapting the work to a non-verbal art form had its challenges.

“The hardest character to choreograph is Offred because she’s the storyteller,” York says. “She tells the story in her head and she doesn’t act,” she thinks. She plots her escape but she is non-verbal. On the surface, she seems to be very obedient and accepting of everything, but that’s not the case. But since he’s a cerebral character and everything happens in his head, it was hard. It was hard to find the movement to indicate something deeper was going on even though we don’t see her rebelling and escaping.

For McAdie, who joined the Royal Winnipeg Ballet at age 15 after training in Edmonton and was promoted to principal dancer with the company last year, York’s reading of Offred is “very precise”.

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“I’m in awe of that,” she said. “It’s so well done. I think the character, as Lila said, is really internal. It’s a very different acting game: finding stillness and more subtle. It’s like a tension in your body. The reactions read better if they are not so giant.

Alberta Ballet will perform the Royal Winnipeg Ballet's production of The Handmaid's Tale at Jubilee Auditorium September 22-24.
Alberta Ballet will perform the Royal Winnipeg Ballet’s production of The Handmaid’s Tale at Jubilee Auditorium September 22-24. Photo by David Cooper /Provided

McAdie’s past work with the company has included more family roles such as Aurora and Princess Florine in Sleeping Beauty and Clara in The Nutcracker.. She also performed the role of Niska in Going Home Star: Truth and Reconciliation, Mark Godden’s story about a young urban First Nations woman. While ballet is often a family-friendly, easily digestible art form based on fairy tales, it’s a form that can also push boundaries, McAdie says.

“People come to see ballets to get away from it all,” she says. “Maybe you need to do some research on what you’re coming to. But I also think it’s important to challenge viewers to see things from different perspectives and to go out and have discussions. I think it’s very important and necessary to share this stuff.

OVERVIEW

Royal Winnipeg Ballet in The Handmaid’s Talehttps://www.jubileeauditorium.com/edmonton/royal-winnipeg-ballet-handmaids-tale

Where: Jubilee Auditorium, 11455 87 Ave.

When: Thursday to Saturday

Tickets: From $63 on Ticketmaster.ca

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LABJ Insider: September 19 – Los Angeles Business Journal https://manteobooksellers.com/labj-insider-september-19-los-angeles-business-journal/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 07:05:27 +0000 https://manteobooksellers.com/labj-insider-september-19-los-angeles-business-journal/ Punked. In the right direction Back then, punk rockers weren’t always the most popular guests at fancy hotels. Fast forward to today, and a book about punk rockers is not only a welcome, but a famous addition to the Kimpton La Peer Hotel in West Hollywood.The hotel has announced that famed photographer Michael Grecco’s book, […]]]>

Punked. In the right direction

Back then, punk rockers weren’t always the most popular guests at fancy hotels. Fast forward to today, and a book about punk rockers is not only a welcome, but a famous addition to the Kimpton La Peer Hotel in West Hollywood.
The hotel has announced that famed photographer Michael Grecco’s book, “Punk, Post Punk, New Wave: Onstage, Backstage, In Your Face, 1978-1991,” will be placed in its suites. And the hotel will host an event Sept. 19 from 6-9 p.m. at which Los Angeles-based Grecco will sign books.
During punk’s heyday, Grecco hung out in clubs, saying he was touched by the “infectious freedom” of punk. The result was the book with 162 shots, a preface by Fred Schneider on the B-52s and Grecco’s anecdotes about the musicians he photographed.

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Los Angeles was largely built around a country and western theme. Think Tom Mix, Gene Autry, Will Rogers (Beverly Hills’ first, albeit honorary-only, mayor). Not to mention all those western movies that early Hollywood produced. But today, if you’re a country music fan, it’s not exactly a one town barn burner.
A ranking of the best cities for country music fans released earlier this month by LawnStarter concludes that the No. 1 city, unsurprisingly, is Nashville, Tennessee. But the No. 2 city, perhaps surprisingly, is New York. This is because the city is big and has so many C&W concerts, western themed bars and even museums that it overwhelms many others. Similarly, major cities appear at the top of the list; Chicago, Atlanta and Denver are all in the Top 10. But Los Angeles, despite its sheer size, is No. 18. There just aren’t many places for country music fans here – like anyone who has ever had an urge to put on a Stetson and a Texas two-step can attest to that.
It is even worse for those who live further away. Of the 180 US cities ranked, Palmdale and Lancaster were in the bottom five, and Garden Grove was last.

The Insider column is compiled by editor Charles Crumpley. Submit your ideas to ccrumpley@sfvbj.com.

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The Delicious Adventure of Skippy the Cat https://manteobooksellers.com/the-delicious-adventure-of-skippy-the-cat/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 01:34:23 +0000 https://manteobooksellers.com/the-delicious-adventure-of-skippy-the-cat/ Whether you’re a kid or an adult, there are so many great cat lover novels you might enjoy. Plus, there’s a fantastic amount of books and information you can get quickly in virtual and physical libraries, ranging from cat stories to crucial care tips. Patty Hughes has written one of the best books for cat […]]]>

Whether you’re a kid or an adult, there are so many great cat lover novels you might enjoy. Plus, there’s a fantastic amount of books and information you can get quickly in virtual and physical libraries, ranging from cat stories to crucial care tips. Patty Hughes has written one of the best books for cat lovers. You can read it while your feline companion sits on your lap and gazes intently at the beautiful images.

Children develop a passion for cats from an early age, whether they have their pet cat or have met one at a friend or family member’s house. There are so many cat-themed children’s books that you can delight your child. These children’s books about cats can help a child’s early learning by including invaluable teachings.

Who doesn’t like a good laugh? Kids love it, and reading fun books from an early age is beneficial as it develops their creativity and cognitive abilities. My Life As Skippy, Black Cat Characters, a fantastic cat story written by Petti Hughes, is a fun read.

A cat named Skippy, a whiskered cat, who lives with two other cats with whom she has a close relationship, tells the story. As the companion of Patti’s mother, Nana, Skippy was adopted. Skippy kept Nana company while Patti worked, and the two had fond memories. Each of the three played a crucial role in the life of the other as they experienced life’s ups and downs together and shared a great existence. The perfect bedtime story for children is this feline-themed children’s book.

The protagonist of the tale and the cutest cat, Skippy, will win your heart. The novel has a lot to offer the young reader, and it does so by using fascinating characters telling tales of cats. It’s a delight for young children and will support your child’s crucial early learning.

Along with encouraging you to embrace every event in your life, Skippy makes sure you enjoy every moment he describes in the book. Skippy ensures that your outlook on life is changed and shaped positively for your children. This fantastic children’s book about cats by Patti Hughes is funny, touching, exciting and enlightening. Everything is included in one book.

Media Contact
Contact person: Patti Hughes
E-mail: Send an email
Country: United States
Website: https://pattihughesauthor.com/

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Opinion: Life begins at conception https://manteobooksellers.com/opinion-life-begins-at-conception/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 19:09:05 +0000 https://manteobooksellers.com/opinion-life-begins-at-conception/ I write this to give a different perspective on the recent “my thoughts” editorial written by Robert Townes. I write acknowledging that, as described, his and his wife’s credentials include the school of theology. From this description I understand that he was and can still be active in Episcopalian ministry. Not having a university degree […]]]>

I write this to give a different perspective on the recent “my thoughts” editorial written by Robert Townes. I write acknowledging that, as described, his and his wife’s credentials include the school of theology. From this description I understand that he was and can still be active in Episcopalian ministry. Not having a university degree or ordination, I am writing to you simply to express a point of view and a conviction different from his. This is respectfully intended. And, in this regard, I can offer that I have a brother-in-law who is a retired Lutheran minister and whose views on Roe v. Wade and the larger topic of abortion seem to follow those of Reverend Townes. We don’t agree, but we maintain a mutual respect.

Reverend Townes shared his opinion and belief on the political and denominational aspects of what he accurately called “a very deep division” in this country over the Supreme Court’s constitutional decision in Roe c . Wade and the confessional aspect of the subject of abortion and rights. As I understand the term, “confessional” refers to professed beliefs that are sworn or “confessed” in creeds, brief doctrinal statements, such as those contained in the Apostles’ Creed and the Nicene Creed. Churches whose fundamental doctrines of belief are set forth in creeds are called denominational religions as opposed to, for example, those which profess sola scriptura. (I invite correction if my understanding of the term is incorrect.)

The Reverend stated his opposition to “removing the right of a pregnant woman to make her own choice about whether to give birth or terminate her pregnancy”, and explained how he came to this position. And last July, the General Convention of the Episcopal Church passed a resolution affirming access to “unrestricted abortion and birth control services.” It is sometimes difficult to keep the meaning of “right” clear in the context of Roe and abortion. Some rights may be considered only in a legal context and others in a moral context, with the possibility that people end up arguing or discussing what they think is a single issue and agreed terminology while the issue is actually broader and the definition of key terms is neither shared nor uniform.

I agree with the Reverend that there is a deep division on this national debate in our country. But I think this division covers the whole Western world, because the subject goes beyond a court order or a piece of legislation in the United States. I disagree with his statement that “the issue we are debating nationally is ‘morally ambiguous'”. by God.

As noted, the Baptismal Covenant in the Book of Common Prayer requires the affirmation that the baptized “will respect the dignity of every human being.” Therefore, I am confused when I read his statement, including doctors and theologians, that it is difficult to agree “when life begins”. On the contrary, there is no real scientific debate on the beginning of human life.

Scientific evidence shows that when the sperm and egg unite, a single cell, or embryo, is created which is a separate life from the mother. From its conception, an embryo shows the behavior and complexity of an organism, distinguishing it from other human cells and from other human beings. DNA is unique in this new life from the beginning and remains a part of this life until the end and even beyond.

Although in a different circumstance, I can understand and identify with Reverend Townes’ description of “every insulting test the medical professionals threw” at him and his wife regarding their pregnancy efforts. I went through several insulting tests regarding a cancer diagnosis. They were also taught by medical professionals and ultimately the course was concluded by a surgeon. Despite the procedural insults, I’m sure we’ll agree that with health care it’s wiser to rely on a physician for diagnosis and treatment over non-mainstream alternatives, as has unfortunately illustrated the tragic case of Steve Jobs. But just as one should not rely on people outside the medical profession to analyze, diagnose and treat medical conditions or diseases, neither should moral analyzes and decisions be based on the opinions of unqualified sources, in particularly political or societal.

The secular-religious debate over Roe has to do with abortion on demand. My objection is only to unrestricted elective abortion, not life-saving and medically necessary abortion. In part, this also comes from personal experience. In my family, there was a medical condition that necessitated the mother’s emergency hysterectomy after the birth of her baby girl. If the medical emergency had developed before a full-term birth, the procedure would have been just as necessary to save the mother’s life, otherwise she would have bled to death. Much earlier in the pregnancy, left in utero, the baby’s life would certainly have been lost as a result of the procedure. In either case, the intent and purpose of a medically necessary hysterectomy would have been the same: to preserve the mother’s life. And despite the outcome, his goal would not have been to lose the baby. While the goal of elective abortion is always to lose the baby.

Further in his remarks, the Reverend says he believes that “we are ultimately saved by the grace of God and not condemned by the actions we take or do not take.” Given, all Christians share the belief that we are saved by the grace of God. However, we can reject God’s grace. And the grace of God is not a license to sin.

Based on scientific evidence, and regardless of policy or legal theory on the matter, the American Medical Association has opposed abortion for more than a century. Calling it “popular ignorance” and the “inaccurate belief that the fetus is only alive after the acceleration period”, the AMA announced its “aversion to the abnormal”. . . crime of abortion” in 1859. (Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol.XII-6.)

Because in biology and medicine the question of when life begins can be answered by objective science, I am of the view that the morally ambiguous question that must be addressed is not when human life begins, but this: when does this human life begin. get a soul? It is a theological question. Answering the question and making a decision based on your opinion, in the absence of theology and science, would be like diagnosing yourself with cancer.

If the position of moral agency, described in the editorial as “the ability of a moral agent to make a choice”, recognizes that choice can be right or wrong, moral or immoral, then I would propose that agency Morality is free will, the exercise of which requires accountability. And the ultimate decisive question would be, and always will be, what is the eternally correct choice (and not the temporally expedient choice) that the moral agent must make? Obviously, the answer is that he chooses good over evil; that is, His will upon his will. The great Anglican theologian and bishop, later Catholic theologian and bishop, John Henry Newman said this about the choices of good and evil, of God’s will and his own will: “We can believe what we choose. We are responsible for what we choose to believe.

Based on the beginning of life and the moral discernment required to consider ending life, I conclude that there is no moral ambiguity with respect to the subject of Roe v. Wade. And while I’m sure Robert Townes holds his stated beliefs and opinions as deeply as I hold my own, we can’t both be right. The words of another English clergyman come to mind: “Opinions change, mores change, beliefs rise and fall, but the moral law is written on tablets of eternity. The confusing part of all this is that we are reading from the same tablets.

Chip Williams is a Northsider.

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